Quote #4 and Quote #5

“In the fierce and seemingly endless battle between (blank) and (blank), the enthusiastic involvement of an unprecedented number of young people — roughly 14% of (blank) primary voters, up from 9% in (blank) — presents the (blank) with an extraordinary opportunity to reshape U.S. politics in the coming years. It is theirs to seize or to squander.

Studies over the last half a century have repeatedly shown that voter preferences among most people in their teens and 20s have not yet crystallized — a pattern referred to by social scientists as the “impressionable years” hypothesis. Yet, in response to the key historical events a generation encounters in late adolescence and early adulthood, young people begin to develop more stable political beliefs and party preferences. More often than not, those party allegiances — even the habit of voting — will stay with them for the rest of their lives.”

“This is an ugly portent for the 25 million or so new voters between 18 and 25 who may or may not vote in (blank). And many of them probably will vote. The ones who go to the polls in (blank) will be the most committed, the most idealistic, the “best minds of my generation” as (blank) said it fourteen years ago in (blank). There is not much doubt that the hustlers behind the “Youth Vote” will get a lot of people out to the polls in (blank). If you give 25 million people a new toy, the odds are pretty good that a lot of them will try it at least once.”

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One Response to Quote #4 and Quote #5

  1. jtorrey13 says:

    http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/la-oe-karabel15apr15,0,7137754.story?track=ntothtml

    “In the fierce and seemingly endless battle between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, the enthusiastic involvement of an unprecedented number of young people — roughly 14% of Democratic primary voters, up from 9% in 2004 — presents the Democrats with an extraordinary opportunity to reshape U.S. politics in the coming years. It is theirs to seize or to squander.

    Studies over the last half a century have repeatedly shown that voter preferences among most people in their teens and 20s have not yet crystallized — a pattern referred to by social scientists as the “impressionable years” hypothesis. Yet, in response to the key historical events a generation encounters in late adolescence and early adulthood, young people begin to develop more stable political beliefs and party preferences. More often than not, those party allegiances — even the habit of voting — will stay with them for the rest of their lives.”

    Hunter again below….

    “This is an ugly portent for the 25 million or so new voters between 18 and 25 who may or may not vote in 1972. And many of them probably will vote. The ones who go to the polls in ’72 will be the most committed, the most idealistic, the “best minds of my generation” as Allen Ginsberg said it fourteen years ago in “Howl”. There is not much doubt that the hustlers behind the “Youth Vote” will get a lot of people out to the polls in ’72. If you give 25 million people a new toy, the odds are pretty good that a lot of them will try it at least once.”

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